Lasik Surgery

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For 20 years Dr. Gillespie and The Ophthalmology Group has offered Lasik, now with laser accuracy more patient than ever are seeing 20/20 or even better!

Understanding Lasik

Chances are, you’ve heard of LASIK. But do you know what it does or what the procedure entails? LASIK is a form of laser vision correction, one of the most popular elective surgeries in the U.S. Using a laser beam, an eye surgeon can reshape the cornea of your eye to make it more ideal for focusing light, thus improving your vision.

LASIK can be used to correct some of the most common vision problems, such as nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. LASIK may be able to completely eliminate your need for contact lenses or glasses, even if you’ve worn them your entire life.

Nearsighted and Farsighted

Refractive Errors

Refractive errors are imperfections in the eye that prevent light from focusing properly onto the retina, causing blurred vision. Two of the most common types are myopia and hyperopia, better known as nearsightedness and farsightedness.

Nearsightedness

Nearsightedness typically occurs when the curve of the cornea is too steep. This causes light to focus in front of, rather than on, the retina, making objects in the distance appear blurry. With LASIK laser eye surgery, the laser can remove tissue from the center of the cornea to make it flatter. This allows light to better focus directly on the retina.

Farsightedness

Farsightedness can occur when the cornea is too flat or the eye is too short. This prevents light from being able to focus on the retina, resulting in blurry close vision. LASIK corrects this by making the cornea steeper and by removing tissue from the outer margins of the cornea, allowing light to more accurately focus onto the retina.

Important Information About the WaveLight® Excimer Lasers

WaveLight® Excimer Lasers are prescription medical devices that are approved for use in performing laser assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to correct certain kinds of near-sightedness (myopia), far-sightedness (hyperopia), and astigmatism. Only doctors who have been trained in laser refractive surgery (including laser calibration and operation) should use an WaveLight® Excimer Laser.

You should not undergo LASIK laser vision correction surgery if you are pregnant or nursing; if you have a collagen vascular, autoimmune or immunodeficiency disease; if you show signs of keratoconus or any other condition that causes a thinning of your cornea; or if you are taking isotretinoin (Accutane*) or amiodarone hydrochloride (Cordarone*). The most common risks of LASIK vision correction surgery with refractive lasers include dry eye syndrome; the possible need for glasses or contact lenses after surgery; visual symptoms including halos, glare, starbursts, and double vision; and loss of vision.

Talk to your doctor and review the appropriate WaveLight® Excimer Laser Patient Information Booklet for your condition to learn more about the potential risks and benefits for laser refractive surgery. For further information, please refer to the additional Important Safety Information on this site, or FDA’s web page on LASIK surgery.

* Trademarks are property of their respective owners.

What Makes WaveLight® Unique?

WaveLight® refractive technology combines the latest surgical advancements into a LASIK procedure personalized for your ideal vision. In the past, every LASIK laser eye surgery patient received the same basic procedure every single time, without accounting for the unique attributes that make your eyes special.

WaveLight® refractive technology is different. WaveLight® technology allows your surgeon to create a personalized treatment plan, with treatment options that take into account your unique visual needs, for your best results.

Astigmatism

Refractive Errors

Refractive errors are imperfections in the eye that prevent light from focusing properly onto the retina, causing blurred vision. One of the most common types of refractive error is astigmatism. Astigmatism is usually present from birth and can blur vision at all distances, from near to far.

Astigmatism and LASIK

Astigmatism occurs when the cornea is more curved in one direction than the other. A normal, healthy cornea is spherical like a basketball, while an astigmatic cornea is shaped more like a football. This causes light to become bent and distorted as it passes through the lens, creating blurry vision. LASIK can correct this by removing tissue from the steeper area of the cornea, making it more spherical.

Is Lasik Right for Me?

Though LASIK has changed how millions of people view the world, it isn’t always right for everybody. To determine whether you are an ideal candidate for LASIK laser vision correction, make sure to do the following:

Consult with your eye doctor

With a quick series of tests and measurements, an eye surgeon can determine whether LASIK will work for you.

Make sure your prescription has been stable

If your prescription has changed within the past 18 months, your eyes may still be changing and could continue to change after the surgery. This could result in the need for follow-up procedures when it would be better, and less expensive, to simply wait.

Review your medical history

Discuss with your eye surgeon any health conditions and medications you may be taking. Certain conditions, such as dry eyes and thin corneas, can affect your surgical options and need to be discussed before surgery.

Myths, Facts, and Fears

The Truth About LASIK

If you struggle with poor vision or feel hindered by contacts or glasses, it’s important to know all of the details about available methods of treatment. Every year, LASIK changes the way approximately 700,000 Americans view the world, and you may be surprised to learn how safe it is. [1]

Is LASIK safe?

Just the thought of a laser pointed at your eye can seem a bit scary! Although all surgery – even LASIK – has risks, but most people who undergo LASIK treatment do not suffer from serious side effects. The most common risks of LASIK surgery include dry eye syndrome; the possible need for glasses or contact lenses after surgery; visual symptoms including halos, glare, starbursts, and double vision; and loss of vision. Be sure to talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of LASIK surgery before you decide whether it is the right option for you.

Will LASIK give me 20/20 vision?

More than 90 percent of people who have LASIK achieve 20/20 to 20/40 vision and are able to perform all or most of their daily activities without glasses or contact lenses. [4] The results vary depending on which eye conditions you are getting corrected. Recent studies have shown the following [5]:

  • One year after surgery, 98 percent of mildly or moderately nearsighted patients obtained 20/20 vision
  • One year after surgery, 86 percent of severely nearsighted patients obtained 20/20 vision (less than 5 percent of Americans are severely nearsighted)
  • One year after surgery, 72 percent of mildly or moderately farsighted patients obtained 20/20 vision

Does LASIK hurt?

Because anesthetic drops are administered to the patients’ eyes prior to the procedure, most people do not feel pain during the LASIK procedure.

How long does recovery take?

Most LASIK patients say their eyes feel normal the day following surgery and are immediately pleased with their vision. The majority of people can even return to work the day following surgery.

Will LASIK wear off? [6]

The effects of LASIK are permanent and will not wear off. One of the largest and longest follow-ups of LASIK patients showed that only 20 percent with low to moderate nearsightedness needed retreatment over a 10-year period. However, it is important to realize that your natural lens inside the eye can still change, especially with aging, and that this can impact your vision—this is called presbyopia.


References

  1. Get Eye Smart. Is LASIK for Me? http://www.geteyesmart.org/eyesmart/glasses-contacts-lasik/upload/LASIK-patient-guide.pdf. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  2. American Academy of Ophthalmology. Refractive Laser Surgery: An In-Depth Look at LASIK.http://www.aao.org/newsroom/guide/upload/LASER_Surg_LASIK_SWGuideNewsroom.pdf. Accessed September 18, 2012.
  3. WebMD. Cataracts and Your Eyes. http://www.webmd.com/eye-health/cataracts/health-cataracts-eyes. Accessed September 18, 2012.
  4. Eye Care America. LASIK.http://www.eyecareamerica.org/eyecare/treatment/lasik/index.cfm. Accessed September 18, 2012.
  5. Eye Surgery Education Council. LASIK Surgery, Outcomes.http://eyesurgeryeducation.org/surgery-options-lasik-outcomes.php. Accessed September 18, 2012.
  6. Boyles, S. Web MD. Long-Term Results With LASIK Good. http://www.webmd.com/eye-health/news/20080102/long-term-results-with-lasik-good. Accessed September 25, 2012.

Important Information About the WaveLight® Excimer Lasers

WaveLight® Excimer Lasers are prescription medical devices that are approved for use in performing laser assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to correct certain kinds of near-sightedness (myopia), far-sightedness (hyperopia), and astigmatism. Only doctors who have been trained in laser refractive surgery (including laser calibration and operation) should use an WaveLight® Excimer Laser.

You should not undergo LASIK surgery if you are pregnant or nursing; if you have a collagen vascular, autoimmune or immunodeficiency disease; if you show signs of keratoconus or any other condition that causes a thinning of your cornea; or if you are taking isotretinoin (Accutane*) or amiodarone hydrochloride (Cordarone*). The most common risks of LASIK vision correction surgery with refractive lasers include dry eye syndrome; the possible need for glasses or contact lenses after surgery; visual symptoms including halos, glare, starbursts, and double vision; and loss of vision.

Talk to your doctor and review the appropriate WaveLight® Excimer Laser Patient Information Booklet for your condition to learn more about the potential risks and benefits for laser refractive surgery. For further information, please refer to the additional Important Safety Information on this site, or FDA’s web page on LASIK surgery.

* Trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Paying for LASIK

An important factor when considering LASIK surgery is the potential long-term savings. Over the course of a 20-year period, LASIK could cost less than the total cost of purchasing and caring for glasses, contact lenses, cleaning supplies, and cases. You also get the convenience of improved vision without the hardware.

The cost of LASIK surgery varies depending on many factors:

  • Location
  • Laser system used
  • Diagnostic tests utilized
  • Surgeon reputation, experience and skill
  • Private health insurance coverage

Insurance

LASIK is typically considered an elective surgery, meaning it usually isn’t covered by private insurance or Medicare. You should check with your insurance carrier or employer, though, to be sure.


Important Information About the WaveLight® Excimer Lasers

WaveLight® Excimer Lasers are prescription medical devices that are approved for use in performing laser assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to correct certain kinds of near-sightedness (myopia), far-sightedness (hyperopia), and astigmatism. Only doctors who have been trained in laser refractive surgery (including laser calibration and operation) should use an WaveLight® Excimer Laser.

You should not undergo LASIK surgery if you are pregnant or nursing; if you have a collagen vascular, autoimmune or immunodeficiency disease; if you show signs of keratoconus or any other condition that causes a thinning of your cornea; or if you are taking isotretinoin (Accutane*) or amiodarone hydrochloride (Cordarone*). The most common risks of LASIK vision correction surgery with refractive lasers include dry eye syndrome; the possible need for glasses or contact lenses after surgery; visual symptoms including halos, glare, starbursts, and double vision; and loss of vision.

Talk to your doctor and review the appropriate WaveLight® Excimer Laser Patient Information Booklet for your condition to learn more about the potential risks and benefits for laser refractive surgery. For further information, please refer to the additional Important Safety Information on this site, or FDA’s web page on LASIK surgery.

* Trademarks are property of their respective owners

CONTACT US TODAY

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The Ophthalmology Group
1903 Broadway
Paducah, KY 42001

(800) EYE-2000

The Opthalmology Group

The Ophthalmology Group 1309 Broadway Paducah, KY 42001 Click here to get directions from Mapquest